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Gregory Tetradis Greger joins the studio

The Family Business is home to eight tattoo artists, all of whom represent very distinct styles ranging from skilled line work by Michele L’abbate to striking geometric patterns by Chisaki, to colourful, contemporary figurative designs by Inma.

Mo Coppoletta, the Godfather of the business, has a design remit that extends beyond tattooing, having produced graphic designs for brands including Rolls Royce, Mont Blanc and Liberty. In his tattoo work, Coppoletta specialises in Oriental styles. “It’s a classic and it never goes in and out of style,” he says. “Symbolism is power.”

For Coppoletta it’s all about the artistry involved in making your body even more beautiful. “I always start from a very decorative point of view: I see a tattoo as a body adornment. I think of the aesthetic more than anything then, of course, every tattoo has its own story, its own meaning, its own reason why. My job is to make my customer’s ideas as beautiful as possible.”

Custom Tattoo Designs - you dream it, we draw it. A line from the Robert Frost poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” this quote hints that the owner of this tattoo intends to live fully before dying.

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H2Ocean’s nothing tattoo pain relieving soap with Lidocaine

H2Ocean’s NOTHING soap with Lidocaine is formulated to effectively help tattoo artists clean and relieve pain during the tattooing process. This uniquely designed product will gently cleanse the tattoo with less irritation and swelling.
This saline based soap allows the lidocaine to be absorbed better in the skin. NOTHING’s added pain relieving ingredient Lidocaine allows the client to experience a more comfortable and less painful tattoo session.
Simply wash the skin as you normally would during the tattoo process and see the results. By offering NOTHING in your studio, you will help reduce pain and anxiety for your clients which means you can focus on your art!

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“Having over 98% of my body tattooed, I have used an assortment of different ointments to help with getting tattooed.
But my most sensitive areas, such as armpits, sternum & ditches, behind my knees, and ankles! And some of my most private areas. The Nothing Foam takes the edge off far better then any other products on the market! I strongly suggest using this for your next client or your next tattoo! You will be placing a order soon, I guarantee.” -Jesse ( Mule ) Hembree

Nothing like some numbing relief in the heat of a tattoo…

“During a session lasting 6 hours, my artist broke out some of this stuff. Where LMX or another cream is designed to prenumb the area, this is designed to enter the open wound and numb the pain temporarily. Part of tattoos is pain, so to use this stuff to knock the edge off is helpful at times. They sprayed the foam onto a paper towel and sat the soaked towel on the area. I’m going to try a more aggressive application next time. That said, lidocaine is problematic if you apply it stupidly.

In large quantities it can interrupt the heart’s electric signals and cause big big issues. Less than a square foot is my rule of thumb with the creams; just enough to avoid tears with the soap. Enjoy!” -Cris “StogiePatriot”

Might work a little too well at times!

“I’ve used this twice during six hour sessions on my lower arm. One might say it worked a little too well at times, since there were some places after using where I couldn’t feel anything except the vibration of the tattoo gun. I have rather sensitive skin, so maybe it works like this for those with sensitive skin. I definitely recommend it for longer tattoo sessions!” -C.Bryant

7 stunning mandala tattoos to admire

In the far-off past, tattoos were something only sailors had, and the only body part people pierced was their ears. Nowadays, piercings and tattoos are everywhere. But like anything you do in life — from driving a car to playing a sport — tattoos and piercings come with some risks. Taking a few precautions will help you get the best results from your new body art and avoid side effects, which can include allergic reactions to inks or piercing jewelry, infections caused by unsterile equipment and needles, and scarring.

“Body art is a popular form of self-expression, but people who decide to get a tattoo or body piercing should go to a licensed facility and take time to discuss the safety procedures with the artists working at the shop or tattoo parlor,” says Scott Bryan, a spokesman for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Fortunately, tattoos and piercings are safer than ever, but before you become a proud owner, it’s important to do your homework. Body artists are expected to adhere to strict safety procedures. By following safety procedures, tattoo artists and body piercers protect themselves and their customers from a range of viruses and bacteria that can cause illness.

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On the other hand, we bossed ourselves around, set impossible goals, and demanded longer hours than office jobs usually entail. It was the ultimate “flextime,” in that it depended on how flexible we felt each day, given deadlines, distractions, and workaholic crescendos.

You’ve been working on a cool design and saving up for your first tattoo. Now it’s time to find a reputable studio and artist who will transfer your artwork from paper to skin. Tattoos are designs on the skin made with needles and colored ink. Getting “inked” is a major decision. Keep in mind that a tattoo is effectively permanent, and although it is possible to remove a tattoo, the process is expensive and painful.

You’ve been working on a cool design and saving up for your first tattoo. Now it’s time to find a reputable studio and artist who will transfer your artwork from paper to skin. Tattoos are designs on the skin made with needles and colored ink. Getting “inked” is a major decision. Keep in mind that a tattoo is effectively permanent, and although it is possible to remove a tattoo, the process is expensive and painful.

UV tattoos that make you glow in the dark!

In the far-off past, tattoos were something only sailors had, and the only body part people pierced was their ears. Nowadays, piercings and tattoos are everywhere. But like anything you do in life — from driving a car to playing a sport — tattoos and piercings come with some risks.

Taking a few precautions will help you get the best results from your new body art and avoid side effects, which can include allergic reactions to inks or piercing jewelry, infections caused by unsterile equipment and needles, and scarring.

“Body art is a popular form of self-expression, but people who decide to get a tattoo or body piercing should go to a licensed facility and take time to discuss the safety procedures with the artists working at the shop or tattoo parlor,” says Scott Bryan, a spokesman for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Ask whether they have had training in bloodborne pathogen and safe tattooing techniques,” Martin advises. “And ask if they use disposable products such as disposable tubes and needles and if they have a working sterilizer on the premises to clean their equipment.”

You’ve been working on a cool design and saving up for your first tattoo. Now it’s time to find a reputable studio and artist who will transfer your artwork from paper to skin. Tattoos are designs on the skin made with needles and colored ink. Getting “inked” is a major decision. Keep in mind that a tattoo is effectively permanent, and although it is possible to remove a tattoo, the process is expensive and painful.

Tattoo

The surprising reason why piercings are so addictive

You've probably heard someone who has a few piercings or tattoos express that getting one makes them want to have more. They're addictive, they might say, but talking about addiction in any form is way more nuanced than just saying you like doing something.

Piercings can be psychologically "addictive," in the sense that many people will continue to see how far they can push their limits once they start getting them, says Stephanie Hutter-Thomas, a professional body piercer and PhD candidate studying the psychology of body art.

"After conquering the anxiety of successfully receiving and healing that first body piercing, it becomes more exciting to choose the next one," she says. "The more exposure we have to a particular chosen event or stimuli, the less frightening or outrageous it seems because we slowly become desensitized."

There's no real research that shows that people are physiologically dependent on getting body piercings, so Hutter-Thomas suspects that people are more likely drawn to the journey or process. "From my perspective, it becomes more a matter of pursuing or maintaining a sense of personal identity, rather than a pathology like addiction," she says.

What you do with your body and how many piercings you get is entirely your choice — and if it feels good doing it, power to you. Walking away with a new piece of jewelry is just an added bonus.

But there is a lot going on inside your brain when you get a piercing, Hutter-Thomas says. When your body experiences anything physically intense, particularly stress and pain, your brain releases endorphins, she says. Endorphins then interact with your body's perception of pain, similar to the way opioids (like morphine or oxycodone) would, she says. "Unlike prescription medications, natural activation of our body's opiate receptors doesn't lead to physical dependency."
Is pain in itself addicting? Hutter-Thomas compares it to some of the "psychologically complex" practices within the S&M community (like choking or spanking). "Pain allows us to experience pleasure by presenting adequate contrast for our brain," she says. Many piercing enthusiasts describe the feeling after getting one as release and relaxation, she says. "Some people seek out a piercing procedure as a form of self-therapy, allowing them to release stress."
Of course, not everyone feels this way about their piercings, and for many people, it's just a way to express themselves. Hutter-Thomas says that someone's intentions for getting a piercing often dictate the type of experience they'll have getting it.

A person choosing a new piercing after spending their time diligently contemplating and preparing for it will often have a more positive experience during the procedure

Pleasure may feel nice, but it doesn't make us happy without something painful to compare it to.

Of course, not everyone feels this way about their piercings, and for many people, it's just a way to express themselves. Hutter-Thomas says that someone's intentions for getting a piercing often dictate the type of experience they'll have getting it.

"A person choosing a new piercing after spending their time diligently contemplating and preparing for it will often have a more positive experience during the procedure," she says. But, if you're just doing it because your friends are all doing it, she says you might not have as great of a time.

Having a solid intention for getting your piercing also means you probably won't regret it, and may pay a little more attention to cleaning the area properly than someone who just got a piercing in haste, she says.

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What you do with your body and how many piercings you get is entirely your choice — and if it feels good doing it, power to you. Walking away with a new piece of jewelry is just an added bonus.